EU Action for Sustainable Landscape Management

At a glance

Duration
2019-11-21 to 2026-01-01
Status
Active programmes
Region
Multi-region
Country
Burkina Faso
Cameroon
Central African Republic
Chad
Congo, The Democratic Republic Of The
Ghana
Kenya
Senegal
Zimbabwe
North America
Anguilla
Antigua And Barbuda
Honduras
Jamaica
Montserrat
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent And The Grenadines
Bolivia
Brazil
Colombia
Ecuador
Myanmar
Cambodia
Viet Nam
Total budget
123,44 M€
GCCA priority area(s)

Support up to 23 projects across 20 countries and 3 sub-regions to promote inclusive and sustainable management of land through integrated landscape approaches that conciliate and meet multiple objectives on a specific territory, in particular:
1) food and nutrition security, resilience, sustainable agriculture, rural development and job creation;
2) climate change mitigation and adaptation, disaster risk reduction;
3) biodiversity and land/forest ecosystems conservation, restoration and sustainable use.

The action focuses on the global level and aim to facilitate knowledge generation and sharing, through technical advice on integrated sustainable landscape management, support to coordination, lessons learning, knowledge sharing, dissemination, visibility and communication. 

 

Countries

Sustainable land management is critical to address the triple challenge of sustainably providing resources for a growing population, preventing biodiversity collapse and mitigating and adapting to climate change, thus contributing to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals 2 (hunger), 6 (water), 12 (green economy), 13 (climate change) and 15 (terrestrial ecosystems), to the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) of the Paris Agreement and to National Biodiversity Strategies and Action Plans (NBSAPs). Landscape approaches aim at allocating and managing land to achieve economic and social development objectives while preserving ecosystems and the essential services they provide in areas where agriculture and other productive land uses compete with environmental, climate and biodiversity goals. By maintaining the biodiversity that supplies critical ecosystem services within farms, forests and rangelands, these approaches ensure that the production of food, fibre, fuel and timber can be sustained over the long run, ensuring both sustainability and climate resilience. Growing pressures on the environment and biodiversity worldwide, and unsustainable land management can have a severe impact on rural communities and their traditional livelihoods, particularly on groups living in vulnerable situations such as indigenous communities and women. Women are indeed disproportionately affected by land degradation, as they bear a significant share of the responsibility for farming and food production, as well as their households. They are also more dependent on land to ensure food security and nutrition and for income earning activities. Climate change can also have a detrimental impact on several human rights, including economic and social rights, such as the right to food, to health and to shelter. And land degradation and disasters contribute to malnutrition, exposure to disease, declining access to water, among other things.

GCCA's action programme
Geographical scope
Country groups
Initial GCCA/GCCA+ contribution
43,960,000.00 €

Specific objective

In order to achieve this, the project will focus on two components which aim to:

Component 1: (SO1) strengthen inclusive and sustainable management of land through integrated landscape approaches that conciliate and meet multiple objectives on a specific territory, in particular: 1) food and nutrition security, resilience, sustainable agriculture, rural development and job creation; 2) climate change mitigation and adaptation, disaster risk reduction; 3) biodiversity and land/forest ecosystems conservation, restoration and sustainable use. Expected project outputs under this objective are: 1) scalable pilot initiatives that help conciliate different land uses, foster innovation and lessons learning are field tested and deliver multiple agricultural, climate and biodiversityrelated benefits; 2) improved land governance and management systems are promoted, notably through better cross-sectoral coordination, enhanced participation of land users and local stakeholders, including local communities, women, and the private sector, in land-related decisions, and other appropriate land governance measures; and 3) the capacities of actors and institutions for sustainable landscape management are enhanced.

Component 2: (SO2) facilitate integrated landscape management knowledge generation and sharing. Under this objective, the action is expected to achieve the following output: 4) landscape approaches for sustainable land management, are promoted through documenting field experience, knowledge generation and sharing, technical advice on integrated sustainable landscape management, support to coordination, lessons learning, dissemination, communication, and contribution to international fora and land related policy discussions.


Outputs

Country/Sub-region (to be filled by focal points/Implementing partners in charge)

Bolivia

 

Burkina Faso

 

Cambodia

 

Cameroon

 

Colombia

 

DRC

 

Ecuador

 

Ghana

 

Honduras

 

Jamaica

 

Kenya

 

Lao PDR

 

Mauritius

 

Myanmar

 

Papua New Guinea

 

Senegal

 

Vietnam



Zimbabwe

 

Brazil-Paraguay sub-region

 

Chad-Central African Republic sub-region

 

Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS)


Activities

Component 1 (projects at national/sub-regional level): within the triple objective of food security, natural ecosystem management and climate change mitigation/adaptation, the first component of this action will support up to 23 projects across 20 countries and 3 sub-regions, encompassing a broad range of activities and measures for land use planning, land governance, conservation and sustainable management, capacity development, sustainable agriculture and forestry, and watershed management, tailored to local contexts. - A first set of country projects intends to focus on field activities for biodiversity and landscape conservation around and within protected areas, as well as on climate-smart agriculture such as agroecology and agroforestry for improved livelihood opportunities. [13] These actions will mostly be deployed in biodiversity-rich countries in Latin America (Brazil-Paraguay sub-region), in South-East Asia (Cambodia and Papua New Guinea), and in the sub-Saharan savannah region (Zimbabwe, Ghana, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo). In the DRC, these will be combined with renewable-energy production activities in order to enhance peoples’ livelihoods and reduce their vulnerability to climate change. In Cambodia, these will be accompanied by specific capacity-building and community-managed activities, while in Zimbabwe it will be implemented through sustainable financing initiatives such as payments for ecosystem services. - A few countries intend to implement activities focusing on strengthening and implementing national land use policies, as well as enhancing institutional capacities. This is the case in Myanmar and Colombia, however, where recently-adopted national policies require further support for implementation and enforcement. - Sustainable forest management and landscape conservation, as well as climate-smart agriculture activities and sustainable value chain development activities will mostly be implemented in South-East Asia (Laos, Vietnam). In Mauritius, forest restoration activities are combined with fauna restoration and conservation. - Certification schemes and labels, voluntary codes of conduct, voluntary commitments of the private sector - deforestation-free and sustainable supply chain activities, and strengthening of markets and financial services - will complement current FLEGT efforts in Ecuador and Honduras. - Activities in Jamaica, Timor Leste and Eastern Caribbean states intend to focus on strengthening ecosystem and peoples’ resilience to climate change through integrated watershed and land management. Integrated water and land management activities will also be the main focus in Bolivia. - Fostering climate- and environment-friendly agricultural development through familyfarming, value chain strengthening and stakeholder platforms will be the focus of activities taking place in Sao Tome. - Activities in the Sahel will mainly focus on addressing competing land uses between pastoralists, farmers and forest dwellers, promote sustainable ecosystem management and agriculture for improved livelihood opportunities and increased resilience to climate change, stability and security. This is the case, for example, in Kenya, Chad-Central African Republic sub-region, and Cameroon. In the latter, this will be combined with support to public-private partnerships for ecosystem conservation, while in Kenya, community-conservation models will be deepened and expanded. - Finally, activities in Burkina Faso intend to focus on strengthening rural economies through the promotion of integrated sustainable landscape management such as forest restoration, agroforestry, water and renewable energy access. - In all actions above, activities aiming at women’s empowerment through food security and access to land, improved knowledge generation on gender issues, as well as good governance (dialogue between concerned stakeholders and land users, partnerships, inclusiveness, community-based management schemes) will be pursued.

Component 2 will focus on the global level, complement component 1, and encompass the following activities: - Technical assistance and guidance to country/sub-regional actions; - Knowledge capture, sharing and communication; and - Learning and outreach, and further promoting and disseminating generated knowledge in international fora.

Achievements to date

Country/Sub-region (to be filled by focal points/Implementing partners in charge)

Bolivia

 

Burkina Faso

 

Cambodia

 

Cameroon

 

Colombia

 

DRC

 

Ecuador

 

Ghana

 

Honduras

 

Jamaica

 

Kenya

 

Lao PDR

 

Mauritius

 

Myanmar

 

Papua New Guinea

 

Senegal

 

Vietnam



Zimbabwe

 

Brazil-Paraguay sub-region

 

Chad-Central African Republic sub-region

 

Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS)

Challenges and lessons learned

The current action is based on several key lessons learnt from previous climate change-, biodiversity and ecosystem services-, and food security-related projects and programmes, such as: - The need to promote synergies between the 3 Rio conventions on climate change, biodiversity and desertification/land degradation, including through concrete activities on sustainable integrated landscape management; - Working in silos on sectorial approaches undermines land governance and the sustainable allocation and management of land and other natural resources, and calls for integrated approaches going beyond established silos or financing instruments, and focusing on inclusive dialogue processes, multi-stakeholder partnerships and actions at different levels of governance (local, national, regional and global), as well as effective synergies between the various policies and initiatives; - Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals requires holistic and crosssectoral approaches. The GPGC has sought to develop such synergies yet much of the potential remains to be tapped into by working across sectors and building on links within the GPGC and with other instruments; - Several efforts at upscaling landscape approaches have shown that there is a need for knowledge-led platforms on sustainable land use, and further creating a movement by breaking silos and putting communities first in addressing landscape-level issues. These efforts have also shown that science and traditional knowledge are at the core of landscape approaches; - Growing pressures and competing demands on land call for more integrated approaches and stronger coordination, as well as good governance systems; - There is need to protect biodiversity outside protected areas, through the sustainable management of ‘working landscapes’. Several research and academia have indeed pointed out the importance of addressing complex conservation issues and systemic interactions outside protected areas4 ; - Integrated landscape approaches that include protected areas and their surrounding areas, and put local communities and authorities at the heart of the conservation effort, proved more effective in addressing multiple challenges and delivering multiple development benefits; and - Land is key to achieving the objectives of the Paris agreement, as several UNFCCC COP decisions point out, and as highlighted by the Land Use, Land-Use Change and Forestry (LULUCF) component of the UNFCCC. This action helps implement the lessons learnt in the framework of the Rio conventions, by supporting activities that: - take into account transboundary approaches at the regional level; - enhance synergies among different policies and implementation strategies;

- engage broadly with civil society organisations, the private sector and other key actors; - encourage activities at the local level which support groups living in vulnerable situations, including women, youth and the elderly; - help strengthen protected area management effectiveness and conservation of natural ecosystems, including the biodiversity conservation approaches of indigenous peoples and local communities; - strengthen ecosystem integrity for the conservation of natural ecosystems and sustainable development; and - contribute to livelihood opportunities and to food and nutrition security.

 

Way forward

Country/Sub-region (to be filled by focal points/Implementing partners in charge)

Bolivia

 

Burkina Faso

 

Cambodia

 

Cameroon

 

Colombia

 

DRC

 

Ecuador

 

Ghana

 

Honduras

 

Jamaica

 

Kenya

 

Lao PDR

 

Mauritius

 

Myanmar

 

Papua New Guinea

 

Senegal

 

Vietnam



Zimbabwe

 

Brazil-Paraguay sub-region

 

Chad-Central African Republic sub-region

 

Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS)