GCCA+ scaling up Pacific Adaptation (GCCA+ SUPA)

At a glance

Duration
2019-01-01 to 2023-06-01
Status
Active programmes
Total budget
15,00 M€

Climate change and natural disasters are two of the greatest challenges jeopardising and undermining the ability of all countries, in particular Pacific countries, to achieve sustainable development and reduce poverty. The proposed Global Climate Change Alliance Plus – Scaling-up Pacific Adaptation (GCCA+ SUPA) action falls under the GCCA+ flagship initiative and is aimed at supporting the priorities of the GCCA+ and target countries where prior GCCA actions have been successfully implemented in small Pacific island countries.

Countries

The ten countries covered by this Action are Small Island Developing States (SIDS) with a total population of about 1.5 million people spread over an immense area of ocean in the western Pacific equivalent to 15 % of the globe's surface.

This group of countries (with the exceptions of Tonga and Fiji) forms a specific group known as the Pacific Smaller Island States (Pacific SIS) established in 2005 at the Pacific Islands Forum Meeting, to recognise the special needs of smaller island states given their limited capacity, and fragile and vulnerable environments. These eight countries, together with Tonga and Fiji, have voiced their concern on numerous occasions that climate change remains the single most important priority for their countries and in addition they are particularly concerned about the impact of disasters on their economies. Nine of the countries benefitted from the GCCA: Pacific Small Island States project (GCCA: PSIS), and with Fiji taking the presidency of COP 23 , together they form a group SIDS highly vulnerable to climate change and committed to take proactive adaptation and mitigation measures.

Three of the countries, Kiribati, RMI and Tuvalu, consist only of low lying atolls, whilst the other countries have a mixture of high volcanic islands, raised atolls, low islands and atoll islands. Eight of the ten countries - exceptions being the single-island raised atolls of Nauru and Niue - are archipelagic states with many populated islands outside of the main capital island. The challenges faced by the seven archipelagic countries to provide services and opportunities for communities in the outer islands are immense, given the vast distances, limited air and sea transport routes, and the scattered nature of the population centres. As a result many countries are seeing migration to their capital island leaving outer islands with depleted populations, and capital islands facing increasing challenges associated with urbanisation, lack of housing and jobs.

The project builds on the successful approach to outer island project delivery adopted by the GCCA: PSIS project, which focused on delivery of on-the-ground adaptation activities in outer islands, e.g. marine resource management in Manihiki, an island in the northern group of the Cook Islands and on water security in the five outer island states of Palau.

GCCA's action programme
Geographical scope
Initial GCCA/GCCA+ contribution
15,000,000.00 €

Specific objective

The Specific Objective is to strengthen the implementation of sector based, but integrated, climate change and disaster risk management strategies and plans.




Outputs

Output 1: Climate and disaster risk information, knowledge management, monitoring and strategic planning capacities strengthened at national and regional levels.

This output will focus particularly on supporting national decision making such that new climate change adaptation interventions are designed and implemented with sustainability at the forefront of the process.

Output 2: Planning and decision making capacities to address climate change and disaster risks at sub-national and community level strengthened, applying participatory, gender-sensitive and rights-based approaches

Especially in the Pacific context, where communities are spread over hundreds of widely scattered islands, sub-national, state, local and island governments provide an important interface between communities and individuals on the one hand and national governments on the other hand. This output focuses particularly on building capacity in resilient development for local area stakeholders.

Output 3: Strategic and local interventions for climate change adaptation and mainstreaming scaled-up in five pre-defined sectors.

This output is aimed at helping countries move away from the present ad hoc system for selecting project sites and sectors, towards a more informed decision making process for sustainable and resilient development.




Activities

Output 1: Climate and disaster risk information, knowledge management, monitoring and strategic planning capacities strengthened at national and regional levels (Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme - SPREP)

1.1. National consultations and development of draft impact methodology;

1.2 Impact analysis of completed climate and disaster risk interventions in three countries;

1.3 Impacts database designed and developed;

1.4 Capacity building in the use of national impacts databases to inform better decision making.

Output 2: Planning and decision making capacities to address climate change and disaster risks at sub-national and community level strengthened, applying participatory, gender-sensitive and rights-based approaches (University of South Pacific)

2.1 Mobilisation and outreach on climate and disaster resilience with local area stakeholders in intervention areas;

2.2 Provision of training in resilient development to local area stakeholders;

2.3 Mainstream and integrate climate change and disaster risk management in sub-national sustainable development plans e.g. island plans;

2.4 Enhance the capacity to implement, monitor and evaluate sub-national sustainable development plans e.g. island plans.

Output 3: Strategic and local interventions for climate change adaptation and mainstreaming scaled-up in five pre-defined sectors (Secretariat of the Pacific Community)

3.1 National level consultations to select geographical focus of measures to be scaled-up in the predefined sector

3.2 Design and implement tangible on-the-ground scaling up measures, which include specific measures designed for women and vulnerable groups, and measures involving the private sector

3.3. Build capacity in the monitoring and maintenance of the scaled up measures

3.4 Mainstream climate and disaster risk into national sector-based policies, plans and budgets

3.5 Sharing and compiling of lessons learnt and sound practices



Achievements to date

(Last reporting December 2021)

Output 1 (SPREP and SPC)

The methodology and criteria for the impact assessment methodology have been prepared and the trial of the methodology in four countries is 75% completed. In 2022 it is planned to prepare and trial a second "Light" version of the methodology, that will complement the existing "extended" version but require fewer resources.

Output 2 (USP)

  • Participatory Needs Assessments (PNAs): Seven countries have completed PNAs (Cook Islands, Fiji, Kiribati, Niue, Palau, Republic of Marshall Islands and Tonga)
  • Identification of Change Agents/Champions: Seven countries have identified change agents (Cook Islands, Fiji, Kiribati, Niue, RMI, Tonga and Tuvalu)
  • Local area stakeholders/champions with enhanced capacity in resilient development: Seven countries (Cook Islands, Fiji, Kiribati, Niue, RMI, Tonga and Tuvalu)
  • Identification of entry points for climate and disaster resilience in sub-national, local area development plans: Six countries (Fiji, Kiribati, Niue, Palau, Tonga, and Tuvalu)
  • New/Revised local area development plans: Four countries (Fiji, Kiribati, RMI, and Tuvalu)
  • More than 600 people trained in project management and proposal writing, women empowerment, and community leadership, and other CCDRM training. The training were conducted in Kiribati, Niue, RMI and Tonga

Output 3 (SPREP and SPC)

  • Mainstreaming climate change and disaster risk management into national policies and sector plans is more than 90% completed in three countries: Fiji (water sector), RMI (health sector), and Tonga (coastal protection sector). A fourth mainstreaming activity relating to the Fiji National Adaptation Plan (NAP) is scheduled for 2022.
  • Final engineering design of the sector-based, on-the-ground activities is completed, and the average implementation rate is 56% for the eight more advanced countries (with a range of 30 – 80%); while implementation was significantly advanced in the remaining two countries, Kiribati and Niue, in the second half of 2021.
  • Sharing lessons learnt: Two virtual regional steering committee meetings were held in April and September 2021 each involving all ten project countries and partners. The meetings endorsed the transfer of savings from travel budgets to country activities plan for output 3, and the second meeting launched the new GCCA+ SUPA website, which is housed on an external server (www.gccasupa.org).



Challenges and lessons learned

COVID-19 related travel restrictions in the Pacific region have been in place since March 2020 and several countries have experienced outbreaks of COVID 19. One impact has been the reliance on national partners, coordinators, managers and officers, to deliver the project activities under the remote guidance of the project teams in Fiji and Samoa. This has positively contributed to capacity building in the countries. One negative impact has been the worldwide supply chain disruptions and delayed shipping schedules, which have slowed down the infrastructural scaling-up activities under output 3.